Tuesday, July 4, 2017



The brain of a mature whitetail is more complex than any high-tech trail camera ( for example: MOULTRIE PANORAMIC 150 GAME CAMERA ) that will ever be invented. Whitetails have survived for millions of years by programming predatory smells, sights and sounds into memory.

For example, say that a hunter shuts his truck door and walks to a tree stand several hundred yards away for two days in a row. While en route, he unknowingly passes upwind of a bedded buck both days. Even if the wind is in the hunter’s favor on the third day, the moment that buck hears the truck door slam, he’ll take for granted that a human is headed into his domain, and he’ll probably either sit tight or go the other way.

If an adult whitetail errs at all, it’s usually on the side of caution, and that means the hunter’s chance of success is near zero. Here are 8 trail camera tips that’ll help you on your quest for trophy bucks.

TIP NO. 1: BE DISCREET

The most detrimental aspect of a trail camera is overuse. A new unit in the hands of a first-timer is like a toy. The owner can’t wait to see results from day to day. This allows deer to program the camera owner’s activity more than vice versa.

Daily intrusion into the woods or along a field edge tells whitetails more about camera owners than those hunters will ever learn about their quarry through photos.

A camera is best placed in a transitional area where it’s easy to enter and exit without being detected. Avoid inspecting the unit for at least a week or more. Do not leave telltale human odor by touching the housing or mounting components with bare hands. A scent-blocking spray should be used on the unit and mount to inhibit foreign odors.

TIP NO. 2: MOUNT YOUR CAMERA HIGHER
Since the conception and subsequent heavy usage of trail cameras, there has been overwhelming proof that a flash will spook some deer from the immediate area. So what about the latest claims by manufacturers that infrared flash won’t spook game. Are they legitimate?

More than half of the photos I’ve taken with infrared flash indicate that the subject deer knew the exact location of the camera when the infrared flash triggered. These photos often demonstrate deer movement perpendicular to the camera, yet the deer’s head is almost always turned looking at the unit.

A whitetail likely first notices the passive infrared heat sensor beam and instantly turns its head toward the camera in time for the infrared flash. Though most professional trail camera users agree that infrared flash is better, they also concur that it still spooks some deer.

Seasoned trail camera user Terry Tank of Glenwood, Minnesota, was one of the first ever to address a solution for the flash problem. Terry began mounting cameras several feet above the sight plane of whitetails immediately after being temporarily blinded by his own camera. He found that this reduced the chances of deer spotting the origin of the flash or being blinded by it.

The higher mounting also prevents deer from smelling a unit at close quarters. He eventually invented the Trail-Pod, which is now marketed through many sporting goods outlets.

The Trail-Pod TM-100 tree mount model allows easy placement of any trail camera in less than a couple of minutes. Its removable universal mounting plate is fitted with a quick-detach lock for ease of camera access. The Trail-Pod has a camera-style ball head for adjusting the unit’s aim. Terry also markets the TLP-200 and Deluxe Camo TLP-300 tripod mount. These units can be placed in areas with no trees and without the noise of tamping a mounting post in the ground.

TIP NO. 3: MOUNT YOUR CAMERA FARTHER AWAY
Why do I get more deer hindquarters than heads? is an often asked question by new camera owners. Most current units offer motion detection and passive infrared heat sensing. Both must trigger to record an event or photo. This ensures that each snapshot contains a warm-blooded animal on the move.

When a less expensive unit is triggered, its camera is slower to power up, focus and record the photo. A five-second or more delay is possible on some economy models. If this is your problem, set the camera farther from the trail or at a 45-degree angle from deer travel. This allows a wider photo cone.

TIP NO. 4: CREATE A BEDDING AREA NEAR A FOOD SOURCE
The shots I get of shooter bucks on my food plot are always after 10 p.m. Why? This is another quandary for many camera users. It’s usually a sign that mature bucks are traveling some distance to the camera site. They likely spend the day in a less pressured area or where there’s more protected daytime bedding.

Creating a better bedding area near the food source will encourage bucks to bed closer and show up shortly before or after dusk. Your odds of harvesting them during hunting season will increase dramatically.

TIP NO. 5: FIND A BUCK’S HIDEOUT, BUT BE CAUTIOUS
My food plot photos show only does, fawns and small bucks. Why am I not getting photos of mature bucks in the area? Does need nutritious food in large quantity to stay healthy and produce milk for fawns. Older fawns and yearlings also need protein-rich food for growth. Though mature bucks need protein for maintaining muscle mass and minerals for antler growth, they often bachelor up in remote areas where food is adequate and human intrusion is less.

According to most studies on deer movement, mature bucks seldom move outside 55 acres during summer months. If you find that sweet spot, don’t overburden it with cameras and human scent, but by all means have some cameras in the area.

TIP NO. 6: PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY
As with tree stands, theft is a major concern for camera owners. The loss of a $100 to $800 unit can be maddening and heart-wrenching. Here’s a solution that often prevents thievery. Post your property with signs that read: No Trespassing — This Property Has Video Surveillance On Its Borders — All Trespassers Will Be Prosecuted! The simple threat of having their photo taken causes thieves to think twice about crossing a property line.

TIP NO. 7: BE CAREFUL ABOUT CAMERA PLACEMENT AT RUBS AND SCRAPES
New trail camera owners are quick to place units over scrapes and rubs. This is OK if the flash is disabled and the camera isn’t checked more than once a week. Most mature bucks in pre-rut, however, freshen their scrapes after sundown. The wisest placement of a camera is 30 to 50 yards from the scrape on an incoming or outgoing pathway. This prevents excessive flash at the scrape or rub site and gives the camera user a better idea of the direction a buck is traveling.

TIP NO. 8: BUILD IT YOURSELF
Those who are electronically inclined can build a trail camera for half-price. Several Web sites sell the components, and other Web sites detail the how-to of assembling a high-quality unit. My nephew, Jake Davenport, began building all of his cameras after becoming disgruntled with $400 units that failed within the first month of use.

WHAT’S IN THE FUTURE?
Top-end trail cameras now offer the recording of time, temperature and moon phase with each photo. Barometer reading will soon be the next option. Remote units linked to cellular phones or computers are now available, but prices are quite high. Within a short time, however, trail camera users will be offered the affordable ability to set the camera and read its photos from afar. It likely will cost no more than a new compound bow.

Although the Boone and Crockett Club will recognize entries previously caught on removable trail camera film or memory card, the club has taken a stand against remote cameras viewed off location. This is seen as a deterrent to fair chase. One can only imagine a hunter sitting in a blind with a laptop or cell phone watching for more desirable deer activity at a second or third stand site. Some states already have laws in place disallowing this, but others will need to clarify current statutes detailing the “taking of wildlife with electronic devices.”


CONCLUSION
It seems there is no end to the devices man will invent to get the edge on mature whitetail bucks. Hunters rarely give this elusive animal enough credit for its innate ability to shun predators. The more we pressure them, the more they learn to avoid us. Rattling is a good example. In my area of west-central Illinois, it’s almost a given that rattling will forewarn older bucks of your presence.

Once archery season begins in October, it’s rare to see even a 4 1/2-year-old-plus buck during daylight hours. And though trail cameras have helped many users plan an effective ambush, they certainly can create a negative effect for hunters who refuse to pay careful attention to detail.

One thing is certain, though: It’s much less stressful sitting in a tree stand on a cold, windy, rainy day during the rut knowing you’ve got a trail camera photo of the buck of a lifetime!


Monday, March 27, 2017

2017 Financial Goals for Small Business Owners


If you are a small business owner, you should be setting goals as early as possible so that you are not caught behind the eight ball as the year goes by. Sweeping changes are expected in 2017, and you’ll need to be ready. For example, it’s predicted that 2017 will be the year that video finally overtakes text as the No. 1 form of communication on the internet. 2017 will also mark the rise of the independent mobile commerce culture, and, of course, virtual reality is on the immediate horizon.

Here’s how to prepare for the changes ahead.


Target Your Niche Even More Precisely


In order to grow your business, shrink your marketing. The major search engines, like Google and Bing, continue to reward localization and punish wide-net marketing strategies. There is also more competition in 2017 than ever before, including premium prices on the best keywords. You will need to stretch out your long-tail keywords even further and delve more deeply into a local or niche culture in order to get that organic traffic that drives the highest conversion rates.

Bother People


Many small business owners believe that the advent of new communications technologies means an automatic influx of customers. Even with the hands-down best product on the market, this is never the case. More robust communications only means more noise as potential consumers are bombarded with a deluge of advertisements and indirect marketing. In order to stand out, you have to personalize your messages – even going customer by customer. You cannot be afraid to bother people, and rejection cannot bother you.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Fundable.com Features International Vintage Watch Company (IVWC) in $1M Capital Raise



LOS ANGELES, March 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- International Vintage Watch Company (IVWC), a Los Angeles Based Luxury and Vintage Watch Company, has announced that it has teamed up with Fundable.com to raise a minimum $ 1 Million to help expand its global e-commerce vintage watch sales.   Click here for Fundable.com Vintage Watch Raise.

Based in the historic Downtown Los Angeles Jewelry District, IVWC has quickly become one of the largest vintage watch dealers in the USA.  IVWC specializes in buying pre-owned classic, elegant timepieces in various conditions and meticulously breathing new life into their functions before making them available on several marketplaces worldwide.  Featured vintage brands include Omega, Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe, IWC, Seiko, Longines and many others.

"Our team members each have over 25 years of experience in the jewelry industry.  Paired with our own appreciation for classic, quality watches, our operation is a labor of love," said Jack Abramov, co-founder and CEO of International Vintage Watch Company.

IVWC reports that 50% of its sales are International, placing the company in a position to compete with other trusted, American watch dealers in the global market.  The company expects to generate $ 3M in online sales in 2017, more than doubling its 2016 sales of $ 1.2M.

Offerings include 1930's – 1950's collector pieces, 1960's retro models, 1970's classics and 1980's – 2000's modern styles, all professionally cleaned, serviced and restored in stunning detail.

The company features collectable vintage premium Swiss and Japanese watches by the finest brands including: Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe, Omega, IWC, Vacheron Constantin, Piaget, Audemars Piguet, Franck Muller, Chronoswiss, Roger Dubuis, Universal Geneve, Bvlgari, Corum, Louis Vuitton, Tudor, Tiffany & Co., Panerai, Breitling, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Hublot, Chopard, Bell & Ross, Breguet, Glashutte, Girard Perregaux, Ulysse Nardin, Baume & Mercier, Sinn, Zenith, Rado, Seiko, Bulova, Gucci, Citizen, Orient, Enicar, Technos, Elgin, Richoh, Milus, Wyler, Fortis, Tag Heuer, Longines, Movado, Benrus, Tissot, Fendi, Ebel, Movado, Raymond Weil, Oris, Hamilton and others.

ABOUT INTERNATIONAL VINTAGE WATCH COMPANY (IVWC)

International Vintage Watch Company (IVWC) is one of the largest vintage watch dealers in the United States.  Based in the historic downtown Los Angeles Jewelry District, IVWC is world renowned for its expert restoration and supply of fine premium authentic vintage Swiss and Japanese made watches.   The company has over 1,200 vintage ladies watches in stock and sells its products globally on several e-commerce marketplaces including Chrono24 Germany, Ebay VividLily Store, Tradesy Online and others.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Banquet to highlight Lancaster Mennonite history


Unusual stories about Lancaster County's long history will be celebrated at the annual Lancaster Mennonite Historical Handmade Patchwork Quilts Society banquet at 6 p.m. on March 25 at the DoubleTree Resort Banquet Hall, 2400 Willow Street Pike, Lancaster.

Author and LNP columnist Jack Brubaker will talk about  “Ten of My Favorite Historical Anecdotes about Lancaster County,” and Janneken Smucker, assistant professor of history at West Chester University and author of “Amish Quilts: Crafting an American Icon,” will discuss his love of quilt history at the gathering. The evening will include music provided by the Ukrainian Kravets family.

The Anabaptist influence in Lancaster County extends to the 18th century.

Rolando Santiago, the society's executive director, says “It is important to celebrate Lancaster Quilting County, and to remember the significance of historical reflection.”

Tickets for the event are $30 and can be purchased at lmhs.org or by calling 717-393-9745. The deadline for registration is Saturday, March 18.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

What Every Small Business Should Know About 1099s


Every year when tax time rolls around, I field questions from business owners about whether or not they need to send 1099s to their vendors. As common as 1099 forms are, they remain one of the most misunderstood Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements.

To make sure you understand the circumstances under which the IRS requires issuing 1099-MISC forms to vendors, I’m going to provide some basic “must-know” information here.

What Is A Form 1099-MISC?


You must issue an IRS Form 1099-MISC to each person you’ve paid $600 or more in services (including parts and materials), prizes and awards, rents or other income payments. The 1099-MISC only applies to payments you made in doing business; it does not apply to payments made for personal purposes.


To Whom Do You Need To Send A Form 1099-MISC?


If your business paid more than $600 to a vendor or sub-contractor [individual, partnership, Limited Liability Company (LLC), Limited Partnership (LP), or estate], you are required to send a Form 1099-MISC to document what you paid them throughout the year. In general, anyone who worked for you—other than your employees—will need a 1099 from you.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Five Steps To Becoming An Empowered Woman (Or Man) Business Owner


As a woman business owner, I’ve found that empowerment comes to us in two ways:

1. Access to external sources of inspiration and knowledge

2. Self-respect and self-confidence

You can sit around and wait for someone to empower you, or you can take the bull by the horns and take action to empower yourself. I will always vote for the latter of the two because it gives you more control over your entrepreneurial destiny.

Although women own nearly 30 percent of U.S. small businesses (according to the Status of Women in the United States website), I find that many of us still struggle with accepting it’s OK to seek empowerment on our own. We often think of it as something that is handed to us. That doesn’t seem very empowering to me!

So, what can women entrepreneurs (and men, too) do to boost our level of empowerment and reach our personal and professional potential?